Bruins prospects update: Beanpot Trophy goes to Harvard, Donato shines with highlight reel goal

The 65th Beanpot championship is in the books and for the first time since 1993, a team not named Boston College or Boston University has won it, with the Harvard Crimson grabbing the trophy Monday night at the TD Garden.

 

 The game between Harvard and the BU Terriers featured four Bruins prospects, and for the BU guys, it was an obviously disappointing night as the team sought a record 31st Beanpot title.

 

 The championship’s outcome was not so much about Charlie McAvoy or Jakob Forsbacka-Karlsson playing poorly (though neither had particularly strong performances) as it was about Harvard rising up and then Ryan Donato putting an exclamation point on the win with a great individual effort. Teammate and 2013 fifth-round project pick Wiley Sherman is enjoying a solid junior season in Cambridge as well.

 

 With 16 goals in 25 games including 5 in his last two, Donato is starting to show the hockey world the sheer offensive acumen that saw him drafted in the second round after David Pastrnak in 2014. As a junior with Dexter, he potted nearly 3 points per game and rode that to a 56th overall selection in Philadelphia. Now, Donato is taking his game to another level as a sophomore after a solid freshman campaign. He began to really put things together at the end of the 2014-15 season when he finished the year (after Dexter lost the 2015 prep championship to Salisbury) out in Nebraska with JFK and the USHL’s Omaha Lancers. Lancer fans still talk about how impressive Donato was in his short time there and rue the fact that he wasn’t able to spend the whole season on that club.

 

 He’s got elite offensive hockey sense with tremendous hands and a will to compete and win.  Last year about this time, TSP interviewed Donato after losing in the 2016 Beanpot tourney and the soon-to-be 21-year-old declared that the Crimson would be back in 2017, and that winning one for the first time since just after his dad left the team to join the U.S. Olympic squad and then the Bruins at the conclusion of the 1992 Albertville Winter Games was something he was determined to achieve.  Donato’s third period goal is worth watching over and over, because it shows that determination that is easy to talk about in an interview, but harder to pull off when the game is on the line.

Here’s the full highlight reel from the game courtesy of NESN, but the Donato goal comes at 5:45 for those only interested in that play: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=izboCRird3A

 

 There is also no need to rush Donato into the mix. He’s a sophomore and the Bruins can afford to wait another year before signing him, however- there is always a thought about the ticking clock on when he could become an unrestricted free agent. Like Anders Bjork, he will be eligible to sign with any team after August 15, 2018 (though he’s still NCAA-compliant to play through the 2018-19 season if he doesn’t turn pro). However, given his history with the city of Boston and the Bruins, it would be hard to imagine Donato passing up a chance to fulfill his lifelong dream of playing for the Black and Gold.

 

 For now- the Scituate native is one more impressive prospect to keep an eye on.


Amateur Prospects as of 02/15/17


Name/Team

League

GP

G

A

PTS

PIM

Jesse Gabrielle, Prince George

WHL

46

26

21

47

67

Zach Senyshyn, SSM

OHL

45

33

13

46

25

Anders Bjork, Notre Dame

HE-NCAA

29

17

23

40

12

Jakub Zboril, Saint John

QMJHL

35

9

22

31

36

Trent Frederic, Wisconsin

Big10- NCAA

20

10

16

26

24

 

Ryan Donato, Harvard

 

ECAC- NCAA

25

16

10

26

12

Jakob Forsbacka-Karlsson, BU

HE- NCAA

30

11

14

25

26

Ryan Fitzgerald, BC

HE-NCAA

26

7

18

25

36

Cameron Hughes, Wisconsin

 

Big10- NCAA

26

6

19

25

12

Jeremy Lauzon, Rouyn-Noranda

 

QMJHL

24

4

13

17

19

Jack Becker, Sioux Falls

 

USHL

35

10

7

17

30

Charlie McAvoy, BU

HE-NCAA

29

3

13

16

47

Cameron Clarke, Ferris St.

 

WCHA- NCAA

30

1

8

9

24

Wiley Sherman, Harvard

 

ECAC-NCAA

25

0

8

8

16

Ryan Lindgren, Minnesota

 

Big10- NCAA

24

1

4

5

55



 

Pro and European Prospects


Name/Team

League

GP

G

A

PTS

PIM

Peter Cehlarik, Providence

 

AHL

40

18

15

33

12

Joona Koppanen, Ilves Jr.*

U20- Finland

19

9

17

26

2

Danton Heinen, Providence

 

AHL

38

9

17

26

10

Colby Cave, Providence

 

AHL

50

10

16

26

28

Jake DeBrusk, Providence

AHL

48

11

14

25

13

 

Matt Grzelcyk, Providence

 

AHL

44

2

18

20

12

Sean Kuraly, Providence

 

AHL

37

9

8

17

19

Emil Johansson, Djurgarden IF

 

Sweden- Elite

38

6

7

12

22

Colton Hargrove, Providence

 

AHL

41

5

9

14

39

Anton Blidh, Providence

 

AHL

30

7

5

12

22

Chris Casto, Providence

 

AHL

41

1

9

10

28

Noel Acciari, Providence

AHL

18

4

4

8

11

Rob O’Gara, Providence

 

AHL

33

2

6

8

12

Austin Czarnik, Providence#

 

AHL

2

1

2

3

0

Justin Hickman, Providence

 

AHL

21

2

1

3

17

Oskar Steen, Farjestad

 

Sweden- Elite

37

1

1

2

6

Linus Arnesson, Providence*

 

AHL

18

0

1

1

4

Brian Ferlin, Providence*

 

AHL

2

0

0

0

0

Zane McIntyre, Providence

                         Atlanta

 

AHL

ECHL

14

2

11

0

0 (1)

1(1)

1.63

1.99

.944

.931

Dan Vladar, Providence

                    Atlanta

 

AHL

ECHL

6

5

3

2

0 (3)

2 (1)

2.84

3.58

.914

.889

Malcolm Subban, Providence

 

AHL

23

7

10 (1)

2.44

.919


# Czarnik recalled to Boston


*Arnesson, Ferlin injured


 Tyler Randell, Tommy Cross, Alex Grant > age 25- not listed

 

Dominic Tiano: The best goal scorer in NHL history is…

Is Alex Ovechkin the most prolific goal scorer in NHL history?

Breaking: Julien out, Cassidy in

The Boston Bruins announced this morning that the franchise’s all-time wins leader and 2011 Stanley Cup-winning head coach Claude Julien has been relieved of his duties after nearly a decade in the position and more than 400 victories. B’s assistant and former Providence Bruins bench boss Bruce Cassidy will serve as interim head coach in Boston. Cassidy, who previously held the head coaching job with the Washington Capitals, inherits a team that most recently lost critical points to the division rival Toronto Maple Leafs in a crushing 6-5 defeat and is fighting for its playoff lives.

With the New England Patriots victory happening today, GM Don Sweeney will hold a press conference to officially announce the move and discuss the way ahead. The timing of Julien’s dismissal is curious, to say the least, but given his pedigree- he is sure to land on his feet and won’t be unemployed for long.

More analysis on Julien’s legacy and expanded context on Cassidy and the organization to follow on the blog later tonight or in next 24 hours.

EDITOR’s note- The conference is over, with GM and new coach meeting the press, plus revelation that Joe Sacco will cover down on D and Jay Pandolfo will move to the bench during games. A lot to unpack and not sure the first/hottest take is going to cut it.

 

 

Dominic Tiano: How USHL rule changes could affect Canadian junior hockey

ushlEditor’s note- The Scouting Post contributor Dominic Tiano is back with a thoughtful piece on the second and third-order effects of the recent announcement by the USHL to modify its import roster player rules. Dom’s instincts and conclusions are sound- one more example of the forward thinking that has brought the USHL into prominence under Commissioner Bob Fallen’s stewardship.

***

Earlier this week, the United States Hockey League announced several rule changes, but there are a couple that I will look at and the possible effects on every level of junior hockey in Canada.

The first is the USHL Import rule, and this change that takes effect next season:

·         Canadian Imports: Applicable only to the Tier 1 USHL, the USA Hockey Board of Directors granted the USHL permission to roster up to two Canadian-born citizens as non-imports. Presently, each USHL team is allowed up to four (4) import roster positions on their 23-man rosters.  This rule change would allow USHL teams to carry a maximum of six (6) imports as long as the two extra import players are Canadian.

 On the surface, this rule change allows USHL teams to add two extra Canadians to their rosters. I’ve always been in favor of more options or opportunities for players to choose from when deciding which path is best for them. But could this have an impact on junior hockey throughout Canada?

Continue reading

Turning the attention to the 2017 NHL draft

The Scouting Post has relocated to the heart of USHL territory in the past 30 days and in light of the completion of the recent World Jr. Championship, we figured it’s about time to start shining some light on some of the players who might be of interest not just to Bruins fans, but anyone who has an interest in the annual NHL draft.

(Editor’s note- because of my work as a scout with the Red Line Report and Moncton Wildcats of the QMJHL, there are some limitations to what I can put out on this blog. Those who remember my 2010 and 2011 Bruins Draft Watch projects probably remember the level of detail and the wide breadth of coverage. Sorry about that, folks- but the hope is that this can point you in a solid direction to go out and do some research on your own.)

2017 NHL draft summary

In talking to multiple scouts and NHL front office members and insiders, the June draft being held in Chicago, is not particularly strong or deep when compared to recent years. At the top of this year’s class are a couple of forwards- Nolan Patrick (recently returned from injury) and Swiss assassin Nico Hischier, who dazzled at the WJC after being this blog’s favorite forward at last April’s U18 championship in Grand Forks. A pair of Scandinavian defensemen in Sweden’s Timothy Liljegren and Finnish all-around guy Juuso Välimäki could be the class of the blue line in 2017. However, the goaltending position is among the deepest and most promising in years, particularly among American puck stoppers- BU’s Jake Oettinger (by way of Lakeland, Minn.) Keith Petruzzelli (Wilbraham, Mass.) and Cayden Primeau (Voorhees, N.J.) are all big, athletic and have high-end NHL potential.

All in all, even if the projections for this draft class aren’t great- there will be eventual  NHL stars to be had, so teams have a chance to accomplish their due diligence and find those values and bargains- they’re out there.

Continue reading

In transit

The blog will be in hiatus for a bit- relocating to a new state and will be catching various games while we get settled. There won’t be a whole lot in the way of unique content for a bit, but we’ll be back!

For quick hits and insights, check out the following Twitter feeds (that is- if you aren’t following us already): @kluedeke29- Kirk Luedeke; @dominictiano- Dom Tiano; @rcduthie- Reed Duthie

 

 

3 Amigos Podcast with special guest Jesse Gabrielle + B’s prospects and the legend of Moe Lemay

3-amigos-gif

The boys are back with another 3 Amigos podcast- Reed Duthie, Dominic Tiano and me bring you our sixth episode since we started doing these before the 2016 NHL Entry Draft last June.

This time, Bruins prospect Jesse Gabrielle joins us fresh off of signing his entry-level contract with Boston over the weekend. The Prince George Cougars winger scored 40 goals a year ago and is on pace for more with a surging team that already has 24 wins on the season.

We also talk Bruins prospects and the upcoming World Junior Tournament. Defenseman Jeremy Lauzon made the final roster for Team Canada, announced last night, while Zachary Senyshyn was the last forward cut. That disappointment will probably provide some extra motivation for Senyshyn, but we can’t help but question Canada’s decision here. His speed and scoring prowess seems like a no-brainer, but they have their reasons. If at the end of the tourney, Canada is not skating around with gold medals around their necks, the decision not to include the player with the second most goals scored in the OHL since the 2015 draft will likely be revisited.

We also have a discussion about the Bruins’ poor home record over the past several seasons, which goes in several different directions before revisiting Boston’s memorable 1988 playoff series win over the Montreal Canadiens and cult hero (former Ottawa 67’s star) Maurice “Moe” Lemay.

It’s a jam-packed 1.5 hours, so we hope you’ll stay with it. We eschew the normal 3 Amigos theme to go all Christmas on you, as well. The Waitresses classic “Christmas Wrapping” is a great way to close it out.

Thanks for listening!

 

 

Becoming Pastrnak

smells-like-victory

It’s official…we can stop speaking about potential because David Pastrnak has arrived on hockey’s biggest stage and he isn’t going away.

13 goals into the 2016-17 NHL campaign, we had every indication that the 20-year-old’s rapid ascension from late first-round pick (23 teams and Vancouver two times passed on him before he got to Boston at 25th overall in 2014) to NHL rookie to a regression in his sophomore campaign to the straw stirring Boston’s scoring drink in just his third big league season was no fluke.

Last night, the native of Havirov in the Czech Republic, practically willed his Bruins to an important victory at home against the flailing Florida Panthers, an Atlantic Division opponent they could ill afford to surrender points to.

The B’s blew three leads, giving up the tying goal late before Pastrnak put on an electric laser show of his own during the 3-on-3 overtime period, taking a David Krejci Harlem Globetrotter-esque behind-the-back pass just inside the Panthers blue line. After that, it was pure magic as Pastrnak took the puck and rushed at former Boston College Eagle defender Michael Matheson who was caught standing still and only helplessly able to wave his stick at Boston’s young star as he went one way, then the other, skating around the blue paint to pull Roberto Luongo practically out of his own gear before firing the puck into the open net on the far side for his second tally of the night and 15th of the season.

We’re only six days into December and Pastrnak has already tied his career-best for goals in a single campaign, doing it in just 21 games where it took him 30 more to hit that total last year. He’s overcome nagging injuries and a ridiculous two-game suspension to keep pumping home the rubber in a year when Boston’s bigger stars- Patrice Bergeron and Brad Marchand– have had trouble finding the back of the net compared to their own normal lofty standards.

After Tuukka Rask, there is little doubt that the most important player to the B’s having been able to keep their heads above water in the early going this season is Pastrnak.

To put it more simply, the kid, who is still some six months away from being legally able to consume alcohol in the city in which he’s found a home, is a player.

Even with the subpar 2015-16 performance, exacerbated by a fractured foot and other ailments that cost him 31 games out of the schedule, we all had an idea that this was coming. Pastrnak made an immediate NHL splash in January 2015 after being a point-per-game player with Providence of the AHL, and has never really looked back.

Now healthy and benefiting from an aggressive and diligent offseason weight training regimen that has allowed him to win far more puck battles and drive the net with greater effectiveness than he could at ages 18-19, we’re seeing the pure skill and joy with which he plays the game paying off.

It’s not going to change, either.

So, how did we get here? There are a few important factors in Pastrnak’s breakout third NHL season, and we’ll try to break them down. This isn’t by any means an all-encompassing list of what drives the young right wing and explains the enormous success he’s having, but it gets to the heart of how he’s become the Pastrnak that has enthralled the city of Boston and Bruins fans all over the globe.

It’s the talent, stupid…

With apologies to former President William Jefferson Clinton, Pastrnak was a top-10 skill forward who fell to the final five selections of the 2014 NHL Entry Draft not because teams didn’t think he could play, but over injuries that took him out of action with Sodertalje in Sweden during the 2013-14 hockey season’s most important stretch drive…January thru March.

Hockey scouts typically confirm the players they are keen on (or not so keen on) during this 90-day (give or take) period, and if you’re not playing, then you could fall out of sight/out of mind.

Pastrnak is not the biggest guy, so a back injury that cost him just about that entire range of pro games probably scared some teams off in terms of durability concerns. To be fair, his struggles to stay healthy last year in Boston don’t alleviate the risk that will likely follow Pastrnak throughout his career. Because he plays the game with such abandon, he tends to put himself into compromising positions to take big hits. However, for Pastrnak to slide out of being a top-15 pick at worst all the way down to 25 was Boston’s great fortune.

Here’s the Red Line Report draft guide scouting report on him from June 2014 (he was ranked 14th and would have been higher if not for so much missed time), and you be the judge as to whether this sounds like a late 1st-round player to you or someone who should have been off the board inside the first 10 selections or so:

Shifty with excellent east-west moves and lateral agility- tough to contain. Needs very little time or space to get shots away from the slot or even off balance or on passes in his skates. Kicks passes from his skates up to stick blade in one motion without slowing or breaking stride. Very active running the PP from both the half-boards and down low- makes great cross-crease set ups. Edges well and is smooth out of his breaks with quick, slashing changes of direction. Great on the rush, utilizing dynamic puck skill and change of pace. At his best driving aggressively into lanes- not big, but fearlessly bulls his way through checkers to storm the net. Absolutely loves the game; great desire and plays every shift as if it were his last. Determined battler in traffic. Dangerous in open ice and impossible to corral 1-on-1. Terrific stickhandler buys time for linemates to get open and shows deft passing skills.

In the end, we can’t definitively explain why Pastrnak slipped so far, but we can say that the Bruins themselves valued him significantly more than where they were picking. According to one team source, they tried to trade up about 10 spots to take him at or around 15 but were unable to pull off the deal. Imagine their unmitigated thrill when they stood pat (and likely resigned themselves to not getting the player they really wanted) and he was still there at 25.

Humble beginnings in Havirov

Believe it or not, Pastrnak himself says he wasn’t always passionate about hockey.

We know…that’s hard to fathom in 2016, but despite his late father, Milan, having been a pro player in Europe’s lower-end league, cresting in Germany’s second division in the late 90’s, the younger Pastrnak was not an instant fanatic of the game.

During his second (and permanent) recall to Boston in January of 2015, TSP’s founder had a chance to sit down with the young rookie and interview him after a Bruins practice and Pastrnak told a story about how supportive his parents were when he was in his first years of organized hockey.

To paraphrase: There were days I just didn’t feel like going to practice, and they never pressured me or forced me to go. When I got older and all I wanted to do was live at the rink and play hockey, they allowed me to do it and were there for me. I think that’s important for kids- that their parents just let them take to hockey on their own schedule. It might explain why some kids burn out or lose their passion for it…it isn’t fun for them anymore. Hockey has always been fun for me, because my mom and dad let me develop my own love for the sport without any extra pressure.

Pastrnak said that there was one rink in his hometown and that he would dress up into full equipment (carrying his skates of course) at the family’s humble apartment and then ride the bus to the end of the line to practice and play. He maintains that the humble beginnings for him have been instrumental in his appreciation for the different places he’s gone since…Sodertalje in Sweden, then Providence, Rhode Island…and of course- Boston, where his pure ability and love of hockey has made him an instant fan favorite. He’s a blue collar kid who plays a decidedly more finesse style, but let’s face it- the love affair started right away because he has embraced Boston with as much force as B’s fans have taken to him.

Drive north on I-95 and never look back

The plan was for Pastrnak to spend a full year in the AHL with the Providence Bruins and if Boston was lucky, he might be ready to get a full-time NHL look for the 2015-16 season.

From the get-go, he emerged as one of the Baby B’s top players, impressing current assistant coach Bruce Cassidy with his maturity, work ethic and humility to go along with the obvious high-end offensive skills that translated immediately to a point-per-game seamless transition to North American hockey.

“He wants to be a player and it shows in everything he does,” Cassidy told us in early 2015 after a Providence game played without the rookie, summoned to Boston days before. “I think we’ve lost him (to Boston)…I’d be surprised if he comes back, and that speaks a great deal to not only his ability to play in the NHL, but the way he came in an absorbed everything we threw at him and not only was able to make an adjustment that not every European kid can, but performed as one of our top forwards. He’s a mature, driven guy- you don’t always see that because he has that easy smile and seems like a typical teenager, but he came in hungry and determined and it’s nice to see him rewarded for it.”

Another story from Pastrnak’s Providence days comes from respected Providence Journal hockey scribe Mark Divver, who talked of the rookie going down to the farm team after spending all of the preseason with Boston. Most of the “good” jersey numbers had been claimed at that point, according to Divver, and Pastrnak was offered No. 32- hardly a distinguished set of digits for a forward, let alone the parent club’s top pick and prospect.

“He said, ‘Yeah- I’ll take that number,’” Divver said (paraphrased). “’My father wore 32 and I’m happy to wear it, too.’ That’s the kind of kid he is- some might have sulked at not getting something more exciting, but he took 32 without complaint and then did some pretty good things with it while he was here.”

Seems like a trite and trivial anecdote, but it’s really not- Pastrnak showed up without an ounce of pretentiousness or entitlement. He just wanted to fit in and be treated like anyone else. Even when he was producing to the tune of 11 goals and 28 points in 25 AHL games before he went up to Boston permanently (Pastrnak did play three games in Providence last season going 1-3-4 in a conditioning stint after returning from his foot injury), he kept it grounded and humble, which is one of the things that the Bruins loved about him to begin with.

He took the lessons and experiences he had in the AHL, hopped in a car and drove up I-95 to Boston in January 2015, applying them effectively and not looking back.

 

Roll up the sleeves and get to work

In that Boston practice early in Pastrnak’s Bruins tenure, TSP was talking to B’s defenseman Torey Krug and asking him about the exciting newcomer. Krug’s immediate answer was pretty telling:

“Look around,” he said waving his arm around the cramped confines of the Ristuccia Arena dressing room. “Pasta’s not in here- I think he’s still out on the ice right now.”

Krug went on: “He’s always the last one off the ice, and I think that’s what makes the young players that stick. That’s what makes them special.”

Now a grizzled veteran, Krug couldn’t be more different from Pastrnak in terms of pedigree and path taken to the Bruins, but the two are kindred spirits when it comes to passion for hockey and the desire to achieve above and beyond what was expected of them.

Pastrnak indeed was the last player off the ice and into the room that day…we even had to ask for permission to stay in the room after it closed so we could talk to him. Permission granted, it was an enjoyable look into the mind of a young man who at 18 already understood the importance of hard work, and he pulled no punches in pointing out that he was motivated by those teams that skipped over him in the draft and made his wait at the Wells Fargo Center longer than it should have been.

“I love Boston and the Bruins,” he said after talking about proving “all the other teams” wrong. “What (do) they say…things happen for (a) reason?”

That attitude and the willingness to work on the ice and off- his conditioning has been a critical difference-maker in his rise near the top of the NHL’s goal scoring leaders this season- is what defines Pastrnak well beyond his impressive ability to play hockey and score goals.

As the old saying goes- “Talent will get you in the door, but character will keep you in the room.”

But don’t take our word for it- here’s what Patrice Bergeron, who back in 2003 knew exactly what Pastrnak was going through as another 18-year-old who beat the odds to make the big club right away, had to say:

“He’s one of those kids who wants to learn, wants to get better,” Bergeron said in 2015. “He’s excited and happy to be here and I think we’re seeing a shell of what he can be and that’s something very special.”

As usual, Boston’s Mr. Everything is on point.

One day, there’s a very good chance that Bergeron will hand the torch and mantle of being the face of the Bruins franchise to Pastrnak.

For now, Pastrnak has become what the team has needed most, and he shows no signs of slowing.

(Editor’s note- For additional reading, here is a link to the original article written by TSP founder Kirk Luedeke on David Pastrnak’s NHL coming out party from the February 2015 issue of New England Hockey Journal- this story and associated quotes and research formed the basis for this blog post.

http://digital.hockeyjournal.com/nxtbooks/seamans/nehj_201502/index.php#/10)

 

 

Happy Thanksgiving

The Boston Bruins face the Ottawa Senators tonight on the American day that we give thanks for what we have.

As always- we appreciate the support on this blog and the 3 Amigos podcast…sorry we didn’t get to Anders Bjork, but with so much ground to cover, it was not an intentional omission.

There will be plenty of opportunities to discuss Bjork in the coming days, weeks and months. Don’t be so sure he will “pull a Vesey,” as his situation is a little different (namely the more rapid ascendance that his play has manifested him into going forward).

We give thanks to you, the fans- for helping inspire the work here. Hopefully, you are as appreciative of the free content provided on this blog in the founder’s free time. This is not a full-time gig.

Happy Thanksgiving and be safe-

Kirk Luedeke

3 Amigos Podcast: Craig Cunningham, the Bruins and a whole lot of other stuff!

3-amigos-gif

Here we are with episode 5 of the 3 Amigos podcast- Reed Duthie, Kirk Luedeke and Dominic Tiano.

We cover a lot of ground in this one, sending our best wishes, thoughts and prayers to former Bruin Craig Cunningham and his family after he collapsed before a game involving his Tucson Roadrunners of the AHL. It was a heart attack and he’s in stable condition as of this posting, but a tremendous outpouring of support has gone out to him- we break it down some more.

We also discuss the early developments of the Bruins season and how the team has stood the preseason narrative of a porous defense and powerful offense on its head thus far. Of course- the podcast was recorded before captain Zdeno Chara was lost in the Tuesday night loss to the St. Louis Blues, so that’s a development to watch. We don’t know much about the injury yet, but if the second period Kabuki Dance in the Boston end was any indication, he’s the one guy this team could ill-afford to be without for an extended period.

Tuukka Rask gets his due for the tremendous performance he’s had thus far, playing like the elite goalie everyone knows he can be.

We talk youngsters Brandon Carlo and Austin Czarnik, plus the savvy veteran additions of Dominic Moore and Riley Nash.

And of course- there’s Bruins prospect talk and a look ahead at some names for the 2017 NHL Entry Draft.

The closing tune is 12 Stones’ “Anthem of the Underdog” which is our tribute to Craig Cunningham- get well soon, Cunner!

Now, go listen to the podcast- thanks as always for the support.