3 Amigos Podcast: Ask the Amigos mailbag, lots of topics- last pod for a while

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Jack Studnicka (Kirk Luedeke photo)

We brought the band back together for one final podcast before the 2018-19 season- it wrapped up on Labor Day weekend, the final official weekend of the summer before we go back to our busy schedules.

Thanks to all of the supporters who took the time to post some thoughtful questions- this one takes us about 90 minutes to get through.

Will try to put it up on Sound Cloud at some point, but for now- you have to listen to it here. It’s not on iTunes and isn’t going to be- limitations of technology at present.

Thanks for listening and be sure to stick around until the end to hear an important message from Dom.

Here’s the audio- appreciate all of the support!- Dom, Reed & Kirk

 

Krug train is rolling

Boston Bruins v New York Rangers - Game Four

NEW YORK, NY – MAY 23: Torey Krug #47 of the Boston Bruins looks on against the New York Rangers in Game Four of the Eastern Conference Semifinals during the 2013 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at Madison Square Garden on May 23, 2013 in New York City. The Rangers won 4-3 in overtime. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

We admit it.

This hockey blog is unabashed in its support of Boston Bruins defenseman Torey Krug. That’s not going to change. Ever.

Maybe it’s because while working for Red Line Report in 2011-12, we recommended the Michigan State captain as the best undrafted NCAA free agent value in the country. Not one of the best values, mind you…THE best. Almost five years later, we’ll take that bow.

Maybe it’s because we got to know Krug off the ice, before he ever really made it as an NHL regular for the Boston Bruins and realized in those moments that he not only had exceptional talent, but exceptional character as well. If a player wants it badly enough, they’ll likely get there. To this day, watching Friday Night Lights reruns on Netflix with Krug, Jared Knight and Ryan Spooner in their Providence, R.I. rookie pro bachelor pad on a December night in 2012 and hearing Krug repeat the “Clear eyes, full hearts…can’t lose” mantra with the conviction of someone absolutely confident of his NHL future stands out as one of the more surreal moments in a life spent covering past, present and future pro hockey players for the past 17 years.

Maybe it’s because ever since he broke into the big league big time during the 2013 playoffs, there has always seemed to be this segment of Bruins fandom who just can’t get past his lack of size and what we can only guess is a sexy draft pedigree that would make them feel good and clean about rooting for him, the way he deserves to be respected.

Whatever the reason, Krug has overcome an understandably slow start to become one of the NHL’s top two-way performers as the 2016-17 campaign wends its way past the halfway mark. We have always been all-aboard the Krug hype train so to speak, and if you can’t at least grudgingly recognize that he’s delivering value for his 4-year, $5.25M extension signed last summer, then you’re not welcome on the train anyway.

Continue reading

On Brandon Carlo and other random thoughts on the 2-1 Boston Bruins

The Boston Bruins got a big win in Winnipeg Monday night and took four out of six points in their season-opening roadie, sandwiching a loss to the Toronto Maple Leafs with victories over the Columbus Blue Jackets and Jets.

Rookie defenseman Brandon Carlo netted his first NHL goal in the triumph last night, unleashing a handheld Howitzer from the slot up under the crossbar that former UMass-Lowell superstar and Mike Richter Award-winning goalie Connor Hellebuyck was powerless to stop. Here’s the goal and it’s a beauty for a 1st NHL tally: watch the way he slides up from the point to make himself available, as Andy Brickley would say and then drives the puck up high where mama hides the cookies.

Carlo has been a nom du jour in Boston circles since the B’s picked him 37th overall in the 2015 draft’s second round. It was a selection acquired from the NY Islanders in the trade for Johnny Boychuk (Minnesota defenseman Ryan Lindgren was the other second-rounder taken 49th overall last June) but the choice originally belonged to the Philadelphia Flyers, who forked it over at the 2014 trade deadline in exchange for Andy MacDonald.

The Bruins certainly look to be getting the better end of the deal these days.

Not only is Carlo a 6-foot-5-inch defender but he’s just 19 years old and has looked far more poised and refined than we gave him credit for. There are sure to be ups and downs for any rookie defender, especially one who’s skating on the top pairing with Zdeno Chara north of 20 minutes per night, but given Carlo’s physical attributes and accomplished defensive/shutdown play coming into his first full pro hockey season, it’s a solid bet that the peaks will outnumber the valleys with this kid.

As for Chara- he’ll turn 40 this season but there’s no need to throw dirt on his playing career’s grave just yet. He’s been effective in the early going and seems to be thriving with his young partner, as both have the size and skill to keep opponents away from the prime scoring areas, while also having the talent and ability to provide offense. The Boston captain had a goal negated on replay last night, but then fired a puck into the Winnipeg empty net after Carlo’s third period tally gave the B’s the insurance they needed for David Pastrnak’s team-leading fourth goal to stand up as the winner.

Chara has been a popular scapegoat over the last two seasons because he’s an aging veteran who by virtue of his outstanding play for so many years, was expected to perform better than he has (especially after a right knee injury suffered early in the 2014-15 season- he’s not been the same mobility-wise and it’s the new normal with Chara). There’s truth in that, but when you improve the supporting cast around future Hall of Famers in the twilight of their career as Chara is, it can make all the difference. It’s only been three games, but Chara and Carlo make an excellent pairing because they complement one another nicely. Unless their play falls off a cliff, the young buck is in a spot to learn a great deal from the legend. It reminds me a lot of what Kyle McLaren was exposed to when he made the Bruins as an 18-year-old in 1995-96 and skated with Ray Bourque. B’s fans will hope that Carlo ends up bringing a great deal more than McLaren did, but the latter was a top-10 pick in 1995, so more was expected of him. Carlo’s contributions, impressive as they are, fall into a pleasant surprise and bonus category, simply because he was the 11th defenseman drafted in 2015. The reality with Carlo is- he wasn’t supposed to be in Boston at 19 and playing 23 minutes-plus while contributing at both ends (he’s a +7 on top of it all with a positive Corsi rating), but we’ll take it. Free chicken never tasted so good.

It’s time to own up to the fact that TSP was far too conservative in our projections of Carlo. There has been a lot of hype surrounding the pick, and hype isn’t always a good thing, but to the former Tri-City American’s credit, he took advantage of injuries to Kevan Miller and Adam McQuaid to establish himself as being worthy of sticking in the NHL. Sometimes, that’s what it takes, because veterans, by virtue of their one-way contracts and experience, will keep positions on a roster over the younger guys because of the economics and options. In this case, Carlo likely would have gone down to Providence, or very well could have begun the season as the seventh defender and a healthy scratch if not for the loss of two right-shot defenders before the start of the new season.

Sometimes, a key factor to solving a larger problem is right in front of you. Sometimes, it takes unforeseen events like injuries to open that window of opportunity to see it, but to Carlo’s credit- he’s shown a lot of poise and maturity. Again- it’s very early in the season, but his play has given the GM options, even if and when Miller and McQuaid return to the lineup. What’s more, you have other impressive young talents in the system: Rob O’Gara is getting big league games under his belt, and looks like he belongs- even if he might not be making the tangible impact on Boston’s fortunes right now that Carlo has. Matt Grzelcyk is playing with speed and confidence down in Providence. Jakub Zboril is playing more like a top-15 pick should in Saint John, and there is a lot of excitement surrounding BU defender Charlie McAvoy now that his NCAA season is underway. He’s been relatively quiet thus far, but a breakout performance is coming- just you watch. Jeremy Lauzon is on the shelf due to a concussion suffered in recent action, and according to his team- there is no timetable for his return. That’s a downer.

There’s reason for excitement down the road, but as impressive as some of those names might be, they are still unknowns. Carlo, on the other hand, is making himself into more of a known quantity each night. And, given the way things are going, it looks like he’s earning more and more trust and a prominent role from the Boston coaching staff.

It was tough to see Boychuk go, but even the most ardent critics of the trade (and granted- it was far more about the timing of it all and the expectations for that 2014-15 Bruins club than anything else), have to be encouraged that Carlo is giving Boston some tangible returns so soon.

The book on Carlo is far from written, but as the old cliché goes: so far, so good.

***

The top line of Brad Marchand, David Pastrnak and David Backes has been carrying the offense in the early going, and somethings got to change if the Bruins expect to keep adding W’s to the ledger.

Dominic Moore tallied his first goal as a Bruin off a nice feed from Tim Schaller, making his Boston debut. Fellow Providence College product Noel Acciari started the play by outworking the Winnipeg defender behind the net to chip it to Schaller who found Moore alone and off to Hellebuyck’s right for a quick snipe.

Unfortunately, the B’s have gotten bupkus from the David Krejci-Ryan Spooner connection, and that needs to change. Austin Czarnik excited watchers with his speed and hands in the first two games, but neither Matt Beleskey nor Jimmy Hayes could get anything going in terms of goal production, so right now- Claude Julien and his braintrust need to figure out how to shake things up and generate some secondary scoring.

Patrice Bergeron’s expected return will move Backes down to Krejci’s right wing and that will help. Danton Heinen hasn’t been bad- he’s made some neat plays, but as said on this space many times- his game is not flashy. We had someone on Twitter say “Heinen hasn’t caught my attention,” and that is precisely the point. He’s a cerebral, playmaking winger who has made several impressive passes and plays in the face of a big hit or effective forecheck, but because he’s not dynamic, few are noticing. Unfortunately for Heinen, in a results-oriented business, he’s expected to produce, so he’ll likely be moved down the roster (or perhaps down to Providence) to try and work out the kinks. There’s a lot of potential here, and at TSP we recognize it…but if a tree falls in the forest and no one is there to see it, does it make a sound?

***

Third year forward David Pastrnak is getting. After. It.

He tallied his first career four-point game (2g, 2a) against Columbus and has scored in every game thus far.

On National Pasta Day, “Pasta” threw the puck to the net and it went in off of Winnipeg defenseman Toby Enstrom. It was a shot that was “al dente” if you please, but Pastrnak is breaking out as multiple analysts thought he might. He’s got to stay healthy, but he’s playing with top talent and he’s shown progress in his physical maturity to go with a work ethic that was already outstanding when he arrived.

At some point, he’ll hit some dry spells, but for now- Pastrnak is delivering the offense that this team so desperately needs, especially with the gaping void where the second and third lines are in the early going.

Of course, the downside to all of this success is the second contract and money that Pastrnak’s agent will be looking for, but all in due time.

***

Tuukka Rask was superb against Winnipeg after allowing the breakaway goal to Blake Wheeler. The former Bruin came out of the penalty box and got behind the Boston defense before twisting Rask around and burying the puck. Moore came back with the equalizer just 19 seconds later, but Rask got the job done after that, denying and frustrating the Jets attack. This is precisely what the Bruins need from their $7 million goaltender, so he’s 2-0 this season with room for improvement, but credit where due- he’s getting it done. Oh, and he became the first Bruins goalie in franchise history to post two assists in a game, so there’s that. Not bad. He only needs 13 more assists to break the single-season mark jointly held by Grant Fuhr and Tom Barrasso.

***

Krejci and Torey Krug are taking heat for their early season struggles. Fans know they had significant offseason surgery and their original timetables to return to the lineup were not decisive in pointing to them being ready to go on opening night, yet they made it.

Now, a great deal is expected of the duo and that’s a fair point to bring up, but the game is not played by robots who magically come back at 100 percent. If they weren’t ready, it would have meant even more untested guys in the lineup and there would have been critics coming out of the woodwork.

We’re allowing a grace period to take into account that neither player was able to do their standard offseason conditioning and training, coupled with a natural confidence test as they work through the surgically repaired hip and shoulder and get a more solid footing.

Neither is performing at their normal level, but now is not the time to pile on. We’ll give it more time and call it like we see it going forward. The good news for the team is that the record is 2-1 and not 0-3…it doesn’t alter the fact that the B’s aren’t getting the high level of play that fans are accustomed to, but that can all change. We tend to make perfection the enemy of good enough. That’s life and the Internet age with pro sports, but no one should be pressing the panic button yet.

2016-17 Boston Bruins preview series: the Defense

Chara4

Zdeno Chara returns for his eleventh season as the captain of the Boston Bruins (photo courtesy of Alison M. Foley)

Closing out the post and podcast series on the Boston Bruins outlook for 2016-17.

I won’t be redundant here in hopes that instead of reading the post, you’ll carve out time to listen to the 55-minute podcast breaking down the defensemen. As I say up front in the pod- I’m not saving the best for last, and hope is not a method here- they’ve not gotten appreciably better since the catastrophic finish to the 2o15-16 campaign.

Even the most optimistic of fans would be hard-pressed to express confidence in the collective Boston blue line, but it is a hard-working bunch and if they don’t get the B’s back to the postseason, it won’t be for a lack of trying.

Listen to the podcast here:

Rob O'GaraBruins

 

Check out the rest of the series posts and podcasts here:

 

Centers

Right Wings

Left Wings

Goaltenders

Download the pods on your podcast app/client: https://scoutingpost.com/feed/

Becoming the Bull: Torey Krug

NEW YORK, NY - MAY 23:  Torey Krug #47 of the Boston Bruins looks on against the New York Rangers in Game Four of the Eastern Conference Semifinals during the 2013 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at Madison Square Garden on May 23, 2013 in New York City. The Rangers won 4-3 in overtime. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

(Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

Back and forth the struggle consumes us all.
Trying to keep a level head.
In the most unsettling of times.
Today I’ll become the bull.  Become the bull!- Atreyu, Becoming the Bull

Nothing has come easy for Boston Bruins defenseman Torey Krug, but as the 2016-17 NHL season dawns,  he enters his fourth full campaign as an NHL defenseman and the first year of an offseason extension that has finally begun to give him his just due.

Much has been made of Krug’s size, but the reality is- when you’re as talented, intelligent and driven like he is, size doesn’t really matter. That won’t prevent the critics, who focus on his physical challenges to contain some of the NHL’s premier power forwards without taking his positioning, active stick and gap control into account, from blathering on and on about how he’s “overpaid” at an AAV of $5.25 million. That’s their opinion, and they’re welcome to it, but Krug’s success is fueled by such snubs. He’s heard it before and he will again, but after shoulder surgery and an opportunity to come back healthy for the first time since early in the 2015-16 season, the 25-year-old is ready to take his play to the next level.

Krug is, in fact, becoming the bull…the bull of the Boston blue line as the team’s highest-scoring defender from last season (and that accomplished with one effective arm) while continuing to evolve as a player who can compensate for his lack of height and weight with the guile and natural smarts to shut down opposition chances.

Atreyu put out the song “Becoming the Bull” in 2008 and it resonates personally with me, as I had just returned from a 15-month combat tour in Baghdad, Iraq during the infamous troop surge of 2007. It was a tough slog, and to this day, I am honored to have served with so many great Americans (not to mention coalition partners and the Iraqi troops we fought shoulder-to-shoulder with against al Qaeda and Jaysh al Mahdi militia) in Task Force Dragon- the 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division (Big Red One) at Forward Operating Base Falcon. We had responsibility for some of the meanest, most dangerous neighborhoods in Iraq’s capital city and 100 Americans in our unit made the ultimate sacrifice, along with another 800 more who were wounded in action. I was fortunate- got to come home with health and psyche intact, and can remember hearing Becoming the Bull for the first time on Sirius radio’s Octane (nu metal) channel and being taken with it immediately. It has remained a personal favorite mp3 on my workout playlist ever since, and this morning, as I was doing my shoulder and biceps resistance training, along with a 70-minute interval workout, it came on and listening to the lyrics, it struck me as a perfect song to describe Krug’s evolution.

It begins thusly:

Grab the bull by the horns the old adage goes.
Nobody tells you where to go from there.
It seems like fate’s pulling you.
Decisions have to be made.
The the best path is the hardest earned.

Think about those lyrics for a second. In 2012, Krug finished his junior season at Michigan State, and his second as the team captain. He had decided to turn pro and sign as an unrestricted free agent- he was grabbing the proverbial bull by the horns and after going undrafted from 2009-11 (to his continued disappointment) he had the opportunity to choose his NHL destination, coming off a 12-goal, 34-point year (38 games) with the Spartans. Nobody could tell him where to go from there, so he had to make a decision in a field of numerous suitors. It seems like fate was pulling him, too.

The Bruins had expressed interest in drafting him, but for a variety of reasons- it didn’t come together. He could have snubbed the team in turn as they did him in 2011, and gone with someone like Carolina, or Philly or perhaps even his hometown Detroit Red Wings. Ultimately, though, he chose a harder path with Boston, a team less than one year removed from winning the Stanley Cup and one of the NHL’s top tier clubs (though they would get upset in the first round of the playoffs by the Braden Holtby-led upstart Washington Capitals later that spring). Krug knew he could have signed with another team and had an easier, probably faster route to the NHL, but he instead embraced the challenge of signing with the B’s, a team that was the only club that made any kind of effort to talk to him when he was still draft eligible. Not forgetting the first team he “danced” with speaks to his personal character in the decision process. The best path, indeed, is the hardest earned.

Of course, it would be intellectually dishonest not to mention that the Bruins had to pay a lot to secure him as a free agent, including burning a year off of his 3-year ELC for just a couple of regular season games to finish out the 2011-12 NHL season, but them’s the breaks. Had they drafted him in the first place, it would have been much less costly- they knew that going in, but to Boston’s credit, they went the extra mile to get their man.

There is so much to stake.
I’ll stumble I’ll loose my place.
Pride and arrogance surrounded by sin.
Destiny takes its hold.
Fight it or let it go.
But I choose how the day will end.

Again, these lyrics emulate Krug. Think back to the contracts he signed before the one in June 2016. He became an RFA after the 2014 season and inked a team-friendly deal in September 2014 to the tune of $1.4M.  Then, he took another budget one-year pact at $3.4M in March 2015 rather than put the team over the barrel and force a longer extension. That was a risk for Krug- had anything serious occurred to him in terms of a major injury, he might have jeopardized his future earnings, but he worked it out with the Bruins to be taken care of later. This becomes especially interesting with the shoulder injury and how it hindered his ability to shoot the puck- is anyone really surprised that he only scored four goals last season? At the same time, had he tallied his normal 12-15 goals in a season, the B’s would’ve been on the hook for more on his four-year extension. Despite the frustration of cratering down the stretch and missing the playoffs for a second consecutive season thanks in large part to a mediocre supporting cast (surrounded by sin?), Krug demonstrated that loyalty is a two-way street.

Destiny took its hold- he’s been rewarded with term and security, with an opportunity to raise the bar even higher in a four-year period as he could very well emerge as Boston’s signature player and a major leader on this Bruins blue line. Sure, he’ll always be limited to a degree by the lack of ideal NHL size, but if you’re going to point to that as a guaranteed limiting factor to his ultimate success, then you’ve probably not been paying enough attention to him at every level of his young hockey career. Krug understands where you’re coming from, and truth be told- folks like you are what have helped to keep that inner fire burning inside him over the years. If he could respond, he’d likely invite you to keep doubting, to keep tweeting about how he “can’t” play defense. As the poet Cliff Poncier once said- whatever tears us down only makes us stronger (or words to that effect. If you don’t know who Cliff Poncier is, then I invite you to check out the 1992 Cameron Crowe film “Singles” and all your questions will be answered. You’re welcome and also- Touch me, I’m Dick.)

And once more- the chorus:

Back and forth the struggle consumes us all.
Trying to keep a level head.
In the most unsettling of times.
Today I’ll become the bull…become the bull!

The most unsettling of times: not a great deal is expected of the Boston Bruins with the defense as currently constructed. Help is on the way with some of their impressive young prospects, led by BU sophomore Charlie McAvoy, but this year is what matters, and Krug is going to be key. Sure- we might see Brandon Carlo, Matt Grzelcyk or Rob O’Gara make the jump and get some playing time. Perhaps Colin “Chiller” Miller will step up and become a far more impactful defender on both sides of the ice than he was a season ago. We’ll see. However, if this defense is going to perform beyond expectations, it likely starts and ends with Krug.

Forget becoming…he’s now the bull. And if you know anything about Krug and his family- he’s embracing that with the typical “bring it on” mantra that has seen him overcome the odds to not only reach the NHL but become one of Boston’s most respected and dependable players.

Here’s the video with lyrics posted to YouTube by “MH Spirit”:

 

 

 

3 Amigos Podcast with special guest Torey Krug

Torey Krug game show

Torey Krug (Photo courtesy of Alison M. Foley)

The 3 Amigos ride again…TSP founder Kirk Luedeke, and Ontario pals Dominic Tiano (OHL Writers) and Reed Duthie (Hamilton Bulldogs play-by-play) have teamed up for a pre-season podcast after a long summer and we brought some big guns to the podcast- Boston Bruins defenseman Torey Krug.

My initial reaction after seeing some of the criticism of the Bruins signing Krug to a four-year extension in late June- shortly before the start of free agency- was to do this…

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Lady Lyanna Mormont reacts to those who took issue with the Torey Krug extension.

Enough with the teaser, though- Krug joins us at the front of the podcast to talk about the extension, being a smaller defenseman in the NHL, his outlook on leadership, and many other topics including an outlook on the B’s defense.

Once he departs, Dom Reed and yours truly talk a little Zach Senyshyn, OHL 2017 NHL draft hopefuls and of course- the World Cup of Hockey.

Apologies for the quality of the audio- this is a low-budget, low-tech operation, but at least we’re not charging you to listen.

Enjoy the podcast and thanks as always for the support!

-Dom, Kirk & Reed

 

What D? The elephant in the room for the Bruins

Zdeno Chara returns for his eleventh season as the captain of the Boston Bruins (photo courtesy of Alison M. Foley)

Zdeno Chara returns for his eleventh season as the captain of the Boston Bruins (photo courtesy of Alison M. Foley)

It’s been a slow August, but I had an exchange on Twitter today that inspired a new post- the first since the Jimmy Vesey recap last weekend. There will be more content in store as we get closer to the new season and of course the 2016 World Cup of Hockey.

With Vesey now officially with the Rangers, Bruins Nation turns its lonely eyes to Don Sweeney, looking at the proverbial elephant in the room- the lack of a clear and meaningful upgrade on the Boston blue line since the end of last season. Re-signing John-Michael Liles was fine on its face, but remember- he was a part of the April implosion that saw the B’s crater after sitting as high as second place in the conference a week and change after the trade that brought Liles to Boston. Also extended- Kevan “Killer” Miller, Colin “Chiller” Miller and Joe (Don’t call me “Blow”) Morrow...what do they all have in common? That’s right- they were all a part of the epic spring collapse for the second year in a row, but 2016 was worse because the B’s seemed to be well-positioned for playoffs at least before coming completely undone.

Not to put too fine a point on it, but the coda- an embarrassingly bad home loss against the nothing-to-play-for except to be spoiler to a division rival Ottawa Senators was a final humiliating kick in the crotch to a season that had far more peaks than valleys, but will ultimately be remembered for the inglorious ending.

So, here we are- a few days before September and unless we missed something- the only new blood the Bruins brought into the organization over the summer via free agency at the defense position is AHL journeyman Alex Grant. Nothing agains the former 1st overall midget pick in the 2005 QMJHL draft- he’s had a cup of coffee in the NHL and even scored some goals- but doesn’t this look a lot like Matt Irwin from a year ago?

We’re still waiting for a serious move to address a defense that was overmatched at best when skating against the top NHL offenses a season ago. This is not a slam on the current Boston defensive core- we think the world of Torey Krug, for example- he deserves to be surrounded by better talent. Zdeno Chara is at the end of a Hall of Fame career, but he’s still a serviceable defender…so long as no one expects his old near-30 minutes in any situation. Gone is Dennis Seidenberg, who, despite his huge heart, just couldn’t be effective on his surgically-reconstructed bottom trunk. Ability-wise, Seids is addition by subtraction, but his experience and veteran leadership will be missed, so you can make the case that this defense is actually worse than it was a year ago. This group needs help and one top-three NHL defenseman acquired via trade would do wonder to take some of that pressure off.

Help is coming in the form of a youth movement that shows a ton of promise. Brandon Carlo and Rob O’Gara could be skating for the NHL club at some point this season (they’re both slated for the AHL at a minimum, maybe more depending on how camp/preseason goes for them) and with their size and mobility, there’s a lot to like about their NHL potential. However, no one should be expecting either player to come in as a rookie and stabilize the Boston blue line. Charlie McAvoy is the cat’s meow after being picked 14th overall and having a sharp B’s development camp in July and even better showing at USA World Junior camp in Plymouth, Mich. earlier this month. But, he’s an NCAA player, so unless he bolts from BU, he won’t help the B’s this season until spring at a minimum when his sophomore year at Boston University is in the books. Jakub Zboril, the team’s top pick from a year ago, is in better shape and rehabbing an image that took a hit from a lackluster start last season- he’s talented enough to be a top-three one day, but how badly does he want it? And don’t forget Matt Grzelcyk, Jeremy Lauzon and Ryan Lindgren– all impressive defenders who bring a little something different to the table. Let’s face it, though- even with the optimism, these players aren’t going to give the 2016-17 Boston Bruins what they really need. Hey- if someone within the organization steps up and delivers, more power to ’em, but this is why folks are getting antsy.

It’s legit.

So, based on some things I was told by sources in the Bruins organization and around the NHL, here’s a quick look at some options, or, irons in the fire, that the second year Boston GM and his management group might be looking at. On paper, this defense is simply not much to write home about given how things went a year ago, and while Sweeney has talked about the challenge of finding the right players at the right price, we’re a few days from September and while you don’t want to use words like alarming to describe the situation, what else are we left with. Albert Einstein once defined insanity as doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. You could apply that to the Boston defense and someone would have a hard time arguing against it.

Preamble over, let’s look at some options- by no means all of them, but something to get the juices flowing, at least:

Kevin Shattenkirk, Blues: The Bruins thought they had a deal for the former BU standout back in February in a deal that would have netted a return for Loui Eriksson, but according to a source close to St. Louis, those talks fell apart over the Blues’ desire to move another bad contract to Boston. Sweeney balked and no deal. Now, same source tells TSP that trade talks are heating up for Shattenkirk again, but not necessarily between Blues GM Doug Armstrong and the Bruins. It sure sounds like the NY Rangers would be a club sniffing around Shattenkirk, especially given his Empire State roots.

Armstrong’s in a tough spot and he knows it- the Blues came close to reaching the Stanley Cup finals for the first time since Bobby Orr took the pass from Derek Sanderson, beat Glenn Hall and hurtled through the air, frozen forever in time (46 years ago), but the San Jose Sharks ruined their (and Boston’s 2016 late 1st-round draft) party. Shattenkirk will be a free agent next summer and he’ll command big bucks even though his value as a two-way defender and power play contributor seems all but assured of declining. Assuming the Blues don’t try to re-sign him, trading Shattenkirk now means Armstrong gets more of a return, but he weakens his talented veteran team. The longer they hold onto him, the more he becomes a “rental” and the acquisition price becomes less than what it could be. Decisions, decisions.

The good: Shattenkirk would instantly upgrade the Boston defense and a top-3 of Chara, Shattenkirk and Krug isn’t a top NHL group, but it’s respectable. He’s very good in transition and paired with an effective shutdown guy (Adam McQuaid?), the shortcomings exposed by San Jose in the Western Conference final series last spring wouldn’t be as profound.

The bad: Let’s be honest- Shattenkirk is a fine player, but he’s on a cap-friendly deal right now, and he won’t be 12 months from now. If you acquire this guy, you either do so for one year and accept that he’ll be gone next July 1 or you have to commit upwards of $7 million a season (ballpark) to extend him. Is he worth it? Remember- you’re going to pay a handsome price to get him from St. Louis, and then you have to commit the cap allocation (and real dollars) to keep him in Boston.

The skinny: Last February, this made sense for the Bruins. Now? Not so much. If Sweeney is going to pay a premium, look for someone younger and more cost controlled. Recommendation: Pass on Shattenkirk and let someone else overpay for him not only in terms of assets surrendered, but in his next deal, which will be a doozy. The B’s already signed David Backes to a controversial big-ticket contract- remember Einstein.

Jacob Trouba, Jets: We’re hearing from several sources around the league that tension and friction is growing more intense between the 2012 NHL draft darling and Winnipeg management. Where he once looked like a franchise player-in-waiting, he’s taken steps backwards after a very promising rookie year, but wants big bucks and more playing time. The Jets committed to Dustin Byfuglien on that, so it sure looks like Trouba’s days are numbered in the ‘Peg, but GM Kevin Cheveldayoff is under no timetable to resolve the issue…if there even is one. On the positive side- Trouba has all the tools of a top-2 NHL rearguard, even if he hasn’t shown it. The risky aspect is that he’s really in no position to be dictating terms, and yet here he is, apparently. That will make NHL suitors wary for third and fourth contract-type maneuvers, assuming he gets there.

The good: Trouba would give the Bruins a young D they could sign to a “show-me” contract (if he just wanted out of Winnipeg) with a delayed payday, much like they did with Krug. He’d instantly move into the top of the rotation and be given every opportunity to prove he can be a bell cow D and earn that massive deal he seeks. The B’s would benefit from his skill and young legs to take some pressure off of Chara and Krug.

The bad: Trouba is risky right now and pro scouts might be a tad squeamish about laying it on the line for him. Is he just human and his play affected by the environment with the Jets? Or is he more of a dud than a stud? Any trade for him is going to cost a lot- he’s only 22 and was a top-10 pick, so Cheveldayoff can drive up the bidding and come away with a nice package/return- you’ll have to overpay for Trouba to get him, and there’s no guarantee he’ll be the player you’re praying he will. If he doesn’t, that’s what costs people their jobs.

The skinny: Go East, young man! Forget the rumors about an offer sheet for Trouba, but if Sweeney could wrangle a deal, Trouba just might be the droid the B’s are looking for. This risk is worthwhile, and when you stack Trouba up against the Bruins defenders player-for-player, he’s better than most, and with the promising defense prospects coming up (at least one or two not named McAvoy would have to go back to Winnipeg, no doubt) within the organization, he’ll get help at some point. But the Bruins need a defenseman now…what good is putting Patrice Bergeron, Brad Marchand, Backes, Chara and company through another season like the last two if you don’t find a way to improve your team and give them a chance to build on two very frustrating finishes.

Cam Fowler, Ducks: I talked about him being an option via trade for the B’s in early July here, so I don’t have a great deal to add other than to say, it’s more of the same with Shattenkirk- Fowler improves the Boston defense and makes them more competitive. Hampus Lindholm to the Bruins via trade is probably a pipe dream- if Bob Murray is going to move a blue liner, we can’t see it being him- Fowler is a more obvious choice. But hey- if that happens- that’d be huge (but again- pipe dream).

Just in case you’re disinclined (too lazy?) to click on the link I provided above, here are some nuggets from that Fowler post from July 2:

Fowler’s your “bridge”- he makes $4M and has 2 years left to UFA status, meaning he gives the Bruins two seasons before they have to make a decision and brings them two years closer to seeing one of their recent top-60 D selections evolve further to see where they might be as NHL players. The issue with Fowler is that he shoots left, whereas the B’s need to shore up their right-shooting talent. So, in essence- if the B’s are able to go out and get Fowler, they then probably need to add another right-shot D for depth and hope that Colin Miller takes a big step next season for them.

The good: Fowler makes the Bruins better. How much? That’s up to you, dear reader, to decide.

The bad: If you pay attention to advanced stats and analytics, Fowler’s valuable on the power play but more of a 3rd-pairing guy at even strength, and the B’s have plenty of those. He’s also going to cost a lot to acquire at age 24. Teams with good D-men are in a seller’s market, which the B’s are unfortunately (for them and their fans) on the wrong side of.

The skinny: Fowler is worth pursuing- there’s real ability there, and he might prove to be a good fit to help stabilize the defense until one (and) more of the young guns are able to develop into NHL regulars on the Boston blue line.

Kris Russell, Unrestricted: In the free agent game of musical chairs, the music has stopped and Russell is looking for a seat. It’s surprising really, even with the concerns about how the analytics translated to his overall game and potential going forward. He’s 29 and has nearly 600 NHL games under his belt. The former Medicine Hat Tigers standout and Columbus 3rd-rounder can really move the puck and pass, but his turnovers and decisions (not to mention the fact he’s undersized) get him into trouble. Granted- how is it that we’re almost to September and he still hasn’t found a landing spot? In a word- money. His agents shot far too high, so he’ll have to take a lot less and the lower the cap hit, the more reasonable a guy like Russell will be.

The good: Russell can move and aid in the transition game. He’s a veteran and he’d represent an improvement on paper to the Boston roster, but that assumes his play doesn’t fall off a cliff- a major factor perhaps in why no team was eager to sign on for the big bucks he was looking for on July 1.

The bad: The analytics are not kind…and we need to be honest with ourselves- the Bruins and their fans aren’t either. A player like Russell will be so heavily scrutinized that he’s more likely to wilt in a bigger role with Boston than he would in more of a complementary spot with a better, even contending club.

The skinny: Signing Russell to a prime market deal on July 1 was the major red flag, but now that we’re reaching the end of the offseason, there are worse things the Bruins could do than sign him to a 1- or 2-year team-friendly deal. Having said that- he’s not a great fit as a left-shot D with similar attributes to Krug- do the B’s need two similar players? Probably not- balance is the key and Krug is the much better overall player- it’s not close. Pass- let some other club roll the dice.

Okay- there it is. Not all the bases covered, but if we get to the start of training camp after the World Cup of Hockey and nothing has been addressed with the Boston defense, then you’re going to see and hear the criticisms ramp up. This 16-17 Bruins roster is a game bunch, but they don’t have the talent on the whole to compensate for the lack of skill on the back end, and throwing up the hands and claiming an upgrade is too hard to pull off won’t cut it with the natives.

Help coming in the form of Brandon Carlo? Might be too much, too soon (Kirk Luedeke photo)

Help coming in the form of Brandon Carlo? Might be too much, too soon (Kirk Luedeke photo)

 

The undrafted free agents: Torey Krug

Torey Krug, David Krejci and Tommy Cross at training camp. Photo by Alison Foley

Torey Krug, David Krejci and Tommy Cross at training camp. Photo by Alison Foley

One can argue that a lack of draft pedigree and the retention of those top-10 picks that the Boston Bruins scored with in 2010 and 2011 is a significant factor in the team’s recent two-year, non-playoff slide.

The flip side to that argument is that the B’s have been able to remain competitive in the Atlantic Division, and aside from last spring’s implosion in the last 25 days, a big reason for that are the contributions of several undrafted free agents to the club’s fortunes.

All three of Torey Krug, Frank Vatrano and Noel Acciari were completely passed over in NHL draft.  The trio went on to play NCAA hockey and eventually signed with Boston, all of them seeing NHL action pretty soon afterwards. In Krug’s case, he’s become one of the team’s most reliable two-way defenders, recently inking a four-year extension. Vatrano and Acciari could both take big steps this year as key contributors while providing different roles in Boston. A fourth free agent, Austin Czarnik, is coming off a very good rookie pro season in the AHL last year and could push for NHL playing time as well, as could journeyman defender Chris Casto (signed in 2013) and former Swift Current (WHL) captain Colby Cave is in the mix down in Providence as well.

Some will say that the lack of former first-round picks puts the Bruins at a disadvantage, but when you consider that Brett Connolly (now with Washington) was the highest-drafted player on the roster from a year ago, draft position isn’t as important as the consistency and production. Without the early draft positions of teams that bottom-out in the standings, the B’s are going to have to keep making hay by finding players wherever they can, and players like Krug and Vatrano are showing that you don’t have to be a top selection to make an impact.

This post, one of several that will go into detail on each undrafted free agent on the Boston roster, looks at Krug, who has been the team’s biggest success since joining the club in the spring of 2012.

He’s proven his mettle: Torey Krug

One of the things the 25-year-old defenseman and veteran of 241 NHL games usually brings up when you talk to him about how he beat the odds without the natural size or a draft pedigree to reach hockey’s highest level is the fact that he grew up with three brothers who all helped immeasurably to toughen him up. The word the Krugs all like to use is “mettle,” and since breaking into the NHL, Boston’s No. 47 has proven his mettle time and time again.

But, in order to begin to understand what makes him tick and drives him, you have to go back well before his time with the Bruins.

A supremely gifted athlete, Kyle and Cheryl Krug’s third of four sons often had to contend with older brothers Adam and Matt, who didn’t cut their diminutive but fiery younger sibling any slack despite a significant age gap between them. With eight and six years respectively on Torey, they were much more physically advanced, which meant they usually prevailed in physical contests. Note the use of the word usually in lieu of always, and young Torey learned at a tender age how to use guile and cleverness to gain an advantage wherever he could (remember that- it becomes important later on). Youngest brother Zak (who didn’t play hockey, instead choosing volleyball as a NCAA student athlete), Torey says, is the most competitive of all of them. The Krug brothers brought out the best in each other, and those intra-family rivalries helped to build a foundation that paved the way for the third Krug son’s NHL success in the wake of his older brothers’ college and pro hockey example.

The former Michigan State captain (named to that position as a 19-year-old sophomore- a rarity that speaks to his character and ability to inspire) has always been driven by his love of family, passion for hockey and the slights and doubts that have dogged him since he was a standout minor player, buzzing around the ice and making players much bigger than he was look quite small by comparison.

His dad, who played at Eastern Michigan and is a well-known coach in and around Detroit, helped build a suit of armor around his son as Torey progressed up the elite hockey ladder there, teaching him the hard lessons that went well beyond the systems their teams executed. There were times when other kids and parents whispered that Torey got preferential treatment as the coach’s son, but the reality is that Krug was pushed harder than anyone else, and he earned that ice time the old fashioned way. When you consider that folks still talk about Kyle Krug cutting some kid named Mike Modano from one of his teams back in the day, it isn’t hard to realize that Coach Krug drove his son harder than anyone else, but he did it to bring the best out of him. Mission accomplished.

Yet, even as Krug excelled in the sport as a teen, college programs kept their distance. Unfortunately for him, the size bias he faced as a high schooler wouldn’t end there. Ultimately, Krug has taken relish in proving the doubters wrong time after time since then, but it was a bitter pill for him to swallow when he would see inferior players his age being recruited and locked up to scholarships while he received tepid D1 NCAA interest at best.

However, as he began to look ahead to his final year of high school for the 2008-09 season, there was one team that came calling. Krug’s willingness to take some risk by leaving home at 17 to play in the much more rugged USHL- a junior league dominated by older, bigger, stronger players provided him with an opportunity to not only win a championship, but put Krug on a path that would bring him to Boston and the NHL just three short years later.

The Indiana Ice convinced him to leave his family in Detroit for Indianapolis. It was a major sacrifice to give up a comfortable situation and play at a much higher level than he was used to, but he went, because if you haven’t figured it out by now- Krug has never backed down from any challenge. And wouldn’t you know it- a young coach named Jeff Blashill, who would one day rise to take a position behind the bench of Krug’s beloved Detroit Red Wings, saw the young defender’s potential and gave him the ice time and trust with which to flourish. Although it wasn’t enough to get him drafted into the NHL that June, Krug’s 10 goals and 47 points in 59 games (very impressive numbers for a 17-year-old rookie defenseman in that league) secured him a place with the Michigan State Spartans, where he would go on to have three fine seasons in East Lansing (and where he got engaged to the love of his life, wife Melanie).

The Bruins could have drafted him, but didn’t. Heck all 29 other teams are in the same boat, and while the bidding was fierce for him in 2012 after a 12-goal, 34 point (38 games) junior season, Krug remembered the interest Boston had showed in him early on. Give Boston assistant amateur scouting director Scott Fitzgerald an assist- he and others in the organization too the time and cultivated a relationship with Krug before he decided to leave school. Even though the B’s courted disaster by not investing a draft pick to secure his rights when they should have, they still got their guy.

Give Krug an apple as well- he could have  chosen from several NHL destinations that might have afforded him a shorter path to the big show given the B’s were just one year removed from winning a Stanley Cup and still had a solid veteran defense in place, but personal principles matter to Torey Krug. Why? Because that’s how Kyle and Cheryl Krug raised him, and he learned the game and personal discipline from his dad, but also courage, selflessness and commitment from his mom. He chose Boston because those are the values he learned from following Adam and Matt around observing their sacrifices and work to play hockey at the pro level. He didn’t just grab the money and quickest path to the NHL because he recognized his youngest brother’s personal courage at walking away from the family’s focus on hockey to blaze his own successful trail in a different sport. The biggest difference between those other teams and Boston is that back when Krug was trying to establish himself at Michigan St., the B’s were the ones who took the time to say they believed in him. Those other guys? Johnny-come-latelies, walking through the door of the party after the main event already happened.

Before you confidently declare that athletes will only act in their self interests, take a moment and remember what Torey Krug did.

Four years and a lockout that wiped out half of the 2012-13 campaign later, Krug led all Boston defensemen in scoring last season with 44 points. Though he scored just four goals, he also played much of the year with one arm, having offseason shoulder surgery that is expected to make him right again. He’s at a disadvantage when it comes to size, but Claude Julien has talked repeatedly about how smart Krug is and how he uses his natural wits to outthink opponents and make the right defensive plays. Some out there might declare that he can’t play defense, but the film study and analytics don’t lie. Every NHL defenseman, no matter how accomplished, gets beaten for a goal on occasion, but Krug is far more effective with and without the puck on his stick in his own end than some give him credit for. Just like he did with his brothers, Krug often outsmarts the opposition and thinks the game at such a high level that he can more than compensate for what he gives away physically to a bigger, stronger forward in most situations.

That intelligence and the white-hot fire that burns within Krug’s heart are what define him as an NHL defenseman. They are what convinced the Bruins that he was absolutely worth burning a year off his ELC to secure, and going forward- is the kind of player who you can expect will do all in his power to get the B’s back on track. The team barely missed the playoffs in April and he was playing on just one arm. Think of what a fully healthy and established Krug might help the team accomplish.

That’s the Krug family mettle taking over again, and if you don’t believe it- just ask them to show you their tattoos. Mettle is much more than a word to them, and they’ve got the ink to prove it.

Torey Krug played at Michigan State from 2009-12 before signing with Boston after his junior season.

Torey Krug played at Michigan State from 2009-12 before signing with Boston after his junior season.

 

 

 

 

The 3 Amigos Podcast Episode 2: NHL Free Agency preview & Bruins draft review

The 3 Amigos- LTD (Luedeke-Tiano-Duthie) are back with our second hockey podcast on the Scouting Post after previewing the OHL in the 2016 NHL Entry Draft on Father’s Day weekend.

This podcast not only recaps the Torey Krug extension and Dennis Seidenberg buyout, but looks at the Boston Bruins’ efforts in Buffalo, breaking down all of the players and handing out (admittedly premature) grades at the end. We also preview what is shaping up to be an active NHL free agent frenzy tomorrow.

We’re already hearing rumors that Oilers Prez and GM Peter Chiarelli is bringing Milan Lucic to Edmonton on a big deal on term and AAV. Just a crazy, wild thought here, but isn’t this the kind of thing that got Chiarelli shown the door in Boston? We break it down a bit. You’ll not find many bigger supporters of Lucic than yours truly- but if we’re talking 6 or 7 years at around $6.5-7M AAV, that could pose a huge risk for the Oil. Lucic is 28 and there’s a lot of tread on his tire- this contract if the rumors are right- could end up being an albatross in relatively short order if Lucic’s body doesn’t hold up. We shall see.

We also talk about the Taylor Hall for Adam Larsson, PK Subban for Shea Weber trades and the announcement that Steven Stamkos is staying in Tampa Bay- all huge stories from June 29.

We also dive into the B’s rumors, especially the reported offer sheet stuff and possible moves for Don Sweeney and company.

It’s a veritable smorgasbord and it clocks in at slightly under 1 hour and 45 minutes.    Alas, my esteemed colleague Reed Duthie was having some internet connectivity issues, so he breaks up in parts. Everyone’s a loser because we don’t exactly get every word he says, but he brings plenty of great insights. When you hear the connection go wonky, know it is not your computer acting up on you- the issue was on our end.

Finally, I posted 3 photos of Charlie McAvoy last night and promised to explain them. Our analysis comes at the 1:31:30 mark, so if you must have that burning meaning of life-type question answered for you, skip ahead.

Or listen to the whole thing. This podcast thing is fun! (Thanks for listening and all of the support for our merry little band- enjoy the theme music)

 

4 more years! Krug signs $5.25M AAV with B’s

ToreyKrug10082

Torey Krug has been consistent in the early going on a defensive unit that has had some tough nights. (Photo courtesy of Alison M. Foley)

More grist to discuss in the forthcoming 3 Amigos- LTD podcast tonight, but the Boston Bruins announced that defenseman Torey Krug has signed a four-year extension worth an annual cap hit of $5.25M.

This simply had to be done.

Krug catches a lot of flak- a lot- because he’s an undersized defender. He’s got terrific hockey sense and the heart of a lion. I can’t get over how so many pretty intelligent people still see him as “just” specialist, but we’ll have to agree to disagree, I suppose- until Krug brings them into the light.

First- the contract…it’s about right for what players similar to Krug are getting. Just look at Minnesota’s Jared Spurgeon (Krug is a better player- more productive and in all three zones, IMO) or Anaheim’s Sami Vatanen. He’s right in the ballpark for what it takes, and I think those who take the stance that he’s “not worth it” or “overpaid” are brimming with suggestions of just how able Boston would have been to offer up the absurd $3-3.5M numbers that have been bandied about on Twitter and certain fan circles. You can feel that way all you want, but reality set in and TSP is fully on board with the numbers Krug got- he earned it.

Another way of looking at it is this: he shot about 1 percent in 2015-16 (4 goals), which was drastically down from his previous 8-9 percent from past seasons. If Krug had gone out and pumped in an additional 10-12 goals over what he got and finished with 55-60 points instead of his career high 44 (40 helpers), then the Bruins would have been paying a lot more to extend him. His low goal totals were actually a blessing in disguise. And don’t forget- he had an injured shoulder and played through it without complaint. If you don’t think that affected his shot, then I have some awesome ocean front property in Manitoba to sell you.

The real issue with Krug is relatively simple- he needs a better defense partner than Adam McQuaid. The former Michigan State captain’s lack of size limits him, so it makes sense to pair him with a bigger, heavier shutdown guy. But McQuaid’s lack of mobility and puck skills contributed to the pair being exposed and exploited at times. When the play did go down into the offensive zone, Boston’s scoring potential was capped by Quaider’s lack of skill/offensive pop. Krug would probably do better with someone like Brandon Carlo or Rob O’Gara, or, if the rumors are to be believed- free agent Jason Demers (assuming the Bruins can win the bidding for him in July). McQuaid is a great guy and his role on this team (though with Kevan Miller, something’s gotta give- the B’s can’t afford to keep both) belongs on the bottom pairing, but the B’s need Krug playing more minutes in all situations, and so he’s got to have a more effective partner going forward.

We owe you a more comprehensive Torey Krug piece and it is coming…perhaps when things settle down a bit. But if there is one guy on this team that many feel like the Boston fans don’t deserve at times because they simply do not get it when it comes to him- it’s Krug. We’ll try, but suspect there is a small percentage of people who, no matter what the statistical and visual evidence says to the contrary, are just going to focus on his lack of size and pigeonhole him as someone who can’t make a difference.

He made a much bigger impact this year than some want to admit, and he’s earned this latest contract, which will take him to unrestricted free agency at age 29 in the summer of 2020. For now, watch him earn every penny.

For a fanbase that claims to be intelligent, informed and passionate about having guys with skill who care, it is utterly inconceivable that anyone is against this signing. In about a year, Krug will be a legitimate bargain at $5.25M through 2020.

If I have any real criticism of the deal- it’s that the Bruins didn’t sign him for seven years instead of four. Yes, I like him that much- he’s worth it.