Off the top of the head: John Beecher

In this new series, will break down what we know about Bruins prospects and bring you up to speed. It’s “off the top of the head,” so there’s really not much else to it- not spending time scouring the internet to look at what others are saying, but just giving the wavetop look and trying to project what might come next.

John Beecher, C/LW

1st selection, 30th overall in 2019 NHL Entry Draft

Current team: University of Michigan (B1G 10)- rising sophomore

Previous team: U.S. NTDP U18

Strengths: Pro-style frame at 6-3/210 pounds- will get bigger and stronger. Terrific skater: plus-acceleration and first-step quickness; can blow by defenders in a straight line and has the agility to go east-west/pull defenders out of skating lanes. Hard worker who can do strong work along the walls when he’s on the flank or drive through the middle of the ice. Excels in puck possession, where he uses his big frame and natural strength to shield the puck and soften defenses up with an effective cycle game. Hard, heavy shot- dangerous below the dots.

Weaknesses: Puck skills are not high-end; isn’t going to carry it through traffic or beat many top D with 1-on-1 moves when he’s facing a tight/hard gap. Vision/offensive IQ is average- not overly creative. Can create space for linemates, but not a line driver. Not a punishing physical presence- long fuse and not afraid of contact, just doesn’t use his natural size to seek and destroy- inconsistent with finishing his hits.

Overall analysis: Generated a ton of excitement over the summer when he shined at Bruins development camp and in the Summer Hockey Showcase with Team USA, using that as a springboard to make the 2020 WJC team. Always kind of lost in the constellation of stars that comprised the USA ’01 birth year, Beecher is a surefire NHL player because of his physical attributes. With his size, speed and ability to get up and down the ice and drive right to the net, he’s tailor-made for the modern game, but he doesn’t have the pure offensive skills or instincts of other USA teammates like Alex Turcotte, Trevor Zegras, Cole Caufield and Matthew Boldy (to say nothing of 1st overall pick Jack Hughes). He scored .5 points per game as a true freshman at Michigan, which isn’t bad given his role. Unfortunately, he’s also the victim of inflated expectations that come from being a first-round NHL pick and one who got hyped because of the summer he had. He’s exactly a week away from turning 19, so this is an example of the hype train getting out of line with realistic expectations. All in all, he didn’t have a bad first NCAA season and he’ll get the opportunity to do more as a sophomore.

Projection: Beecher looks like a rock-solid eventual 3rd-line NHL center, but could move up or down the lineup and make an impact first on the wing. It’s not going to happen quickly for him (he’ll likely follow Trent Frederic’s blueprint and get seasoning in the AHL first), but he’s a good fit for the type of team the Bruins are all about: mobile, heavy on pucks and potentially has an untapped offensive dimension to his game. He’s not the physical, tough-to-play against type of forward like Frederic or Nick Ritchie, but as someone who has seen it firsthand, Beecher has it in him to grab the puck and skate down the ice like a runaway freight train…when he dips his shoulder and goes to the net it’s a thing of beauty.

He’s a complementary piece in our view, but the perfect kind of supporting cast player for a team like the Bruins, whose systems and style will suit him perfectly. The B’s could have drafted more skill at the 30th pick with someone like Bobby Brink, but Beecher is solid and after Jack Studnicka, represents the best the B’s have in the prospect pipeline at forward.

Here’s the USHL interview (Ben Gislason) with him after the Bruins called his name in Vancouver.

Thoughts on “the Trade”- 30 years ago today Wayne Gretzky to Los Angeles helped to transform hockey in the USA

 

https://www.tsn.ca/the-trade-30-years-later-1.1155314

(Video posted to YouTube by CBC)

August 9, 1988…

I was 16 and in Florida visiting my grandparents with about a month left before my junior year in high school. I walked into the house that afternoon after a visit down to New Smyrna Beach, and my grandfather, a big baseball and football fan but who didn’t know (or give) a whit about hockey, greeted me with the last news I ever expected to hear.

“Hey, Kirk- did you hear that Wayne Gadsby just got traded?”

I must’ve stared at him blankly, because he followed up with: “You know? That hockey player from Canada?”

I didn’t have the heart to tell him that the largest percentage of hockey players in the NHL were from Canada, but my brain was beginning to process what he’d just said.

“Wayne Gretzky got traded?” I said.

“Yes! Gretzky…that’s the one! They’ve been talking about it a lot on the TV and radio…”

He started to tell me what he knew about the deal…Los Angeles Kings…cash and young players…but his words were like the teacher in Charlie Brown (Wah-WAH-Wah-Wah-Wah.) My mind was racing: Gretzky, the Edmonton Oilers’ four-time Stanley Cup captain and face of hockey, the only player in the history of the game to score more than 200 points in a season not once, not twice, not three times but FOUR times…had been dealt in the prime of his life at 27 years old. My goodness, I thought as the realization hit me- if my grandfather Merlin in Florida is talking about this trade- how enormous of an impact is Gretzky to Tinseltown going to have on the NHL and hockey?

The truth is…in my teenage mind, I couldn’t even begin to comprehend it.

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